entrepreneurs

good news

Here's why we can't wait to get in the Hella Black Brunch kitchen with Chef Shonda

When we decided to have a Hella Black Brunch pop-up in New Orleans, we knew we wanted to expand our focus from simply building community with Black and queer folks of the African diaspora, to also embracing and supporting the burgeoning entrepreneurial community in their historically Black spaces.

In order to do that, it became important that we partner with folks native to the beautiful New Orleans community - folks working to build for themselves and those around them.

When we came into contact with Chef LaShonda Cross - most well and lovingly known as just: Chef Shonda - we knew it was a perfect match.

chef shonda new orleans chef lashonda cross

The partnership between Chef Shonda and Khafra grew organically, and - as most things do these days - over the Internet. Since our first fateful interaction, Chef Shonda has joined Hella Black Brunch Bonne Fete as our Executive Chef - and we’re so excited to share what we have in store with this collaboration!

But first, we wanted to give you a chance to learn about the person behind the chef’s coat.

We spoke to Chef Shonda earlier this month and discussed her origins, her love for New Orleans, her thoughts on the growing Black business community, and much more.
Below are some of our fave moments from the conversation!

 


Who is Lashonda/Chef Shonda?
I am a kind, fun loving soul who is honestly trying to spread a little peace, love, and happiness in this world. Because, honestly, the world needs more of it.

What drew you to the kitchen?
It started when I was 12 or 13 at home, of course - with family and cooking with my sister. Every Thanksgiving, we’d gather at her house. I was the one with her - in the kitchen, going to the grocery store, and learning. I was previously a carpenter building houses, and I found this peace in the kitchen. This quiet, this calm. It was unlike any other space.

chef lashonda cross chef shonda new orleans

Can you talk a little about being a Black woman working in the food industry?
So, I quit my job and I found a job in the kitchen at The American Sector Restaurant + Bar in The National World War II Museum. And then I found out that Chef Nina Compton, who was on Top Chef Nola, was opening a restaurant. I reached out to her and told her I wanted to work for her. She’s a Black female executive chef and I said “I promise you won’t regret it.” To this day, I don’t think she does. And we have such a beautiful working relationship.

In the culinary world it’s difficult for women, period. It’s a very male dominated game. To see Nina (who has not yet reached her pinnacle, because she has so much more in her) … but to see her and to know that I can too can reach such heights in this culinary world and be a force is such an amazing feeling.

chef shonda nola new orleans

A major facet of HBB centers on building community with Black folks over food. What is your relationship to food and community?
When you think of Nola, you think of food. And as far as community is concerned, food is one of the things that over time has always brought everyone together. Everyone is welcome at the family table. So I think that’s honestly how it all ties in. We’re all connected by not only the fact that we are all human, ut that [we have a universal] need to survive. And it is food.

Nola post katrina new orleans

Have you noticed anything different pre- and post-Katrina about Black entrepreneurship and the energy of New Orleans as a city?
I have never seen so many Black businesses ever, growing up in Nola and throughout my childhood. And not only are there so many, but they’re also flourishing. That’s because of the support that we have in the community. It’s happening all over and there’s no way we can fail if we are supporting one another.

Why did you decide to partner with HBB? What are you hoping comes from this?
When khoLi. reached out to me I did a little research on who she is and what she does with Khafra and what they stand for. Honestly, I couldn’t pass it up. The community support was a big thing for me. The LGBT community, that support was a big thing for me. And I said “Hey, why not?!” Why not support someone who is supporting us and what we do and not only chefs but just as people?

I hope that everyone who comes to sit down at the table and eat with us takes something away from the experience. That there’s some positivity and light in it all.

We hope so too. In fact, if you're ready to get into this menu with Chef Shonda ...

PURCHASE YOUR TICKET NOW.
AND GRAB ONE FOR A FRIEND, WHILE YOU'RE AT IT!

 

(all photos and video courtesy of Chef Shonda)

 

entrepreneur tips

We could all learn something from this 22-year-old millionaire

growing wealth

There are so many things you can do in your 20s to grow wealth by the time you're 30. Like putting 25% of your paycheck into an untouchable savings account, saving specifically to invest, focusing on earning money and securing a financially stable future ... the list goes on.

rudolph maag

At 25, knowing that I still have about 5 years left to "get it together," my biggest obstacle is finding a well-paying job that will provide me with the biggest opportunity to invest in my future (read: I need a real paycheck and a real salary).

Being in your 20s and in debt because of college is challenging, especially when you're living paycheck to paycheck and essentially chipping away at your student loan interest. It's discouraging. You can't get a job in your field of study because you don't have enough experience, and you can't get any experience unless you're willing to intern for free, and interning for free doesn't pay the bills.

rudolph maag seattle

It's a double-edged sword - you work to survive and you survive to work. And that's not the life that I envisioned for myself 10 years ago.

So I'm trying to change it, and I'm starting to think differently, with a little help.

Tucker Hughes is an entrepreneur and a real human being who generated a million dollars in commissions - in the real-estate industry - by the time he was 22.  Of course, he's something of an overachiever: He received his master's at the age of 20 after fast-tracking four years of school, he's traveled to more than 50 countries, he's completed 13 triathlons; this list, too, continues. 

When Hughes finished school, however, he was broke, but, luckily, not broken. In fact, Hughes attributes his success in the business world to a shift in his mental thinking.

Check out the seven shifts Hughes made in his thinking + the  core values in the video below.

 

SEVEN MENTAL SHIFTS TO HELP YOU BUILD WEALTH

  1. Age is just a number.
  2. Reinvest in yourself.
  3. Avoid decision fatigue.
  4. Build a resilient mind.
  5. Think big. Be big.
  6. Be methodical.
  7. Believe in yourself.

Your life is your investment, and it is critical, and so, so necessary, to invest in your personal growth in ways that you probably didn't think about before. Because if you don't invest in yourself, no one will.

Not sure how to get started?

Consume knowledge voraciously and know that you will always have an appetite for more. 

  1. Pick up a book about an unknown subject and read it for an hour a day 
  2. Listen to podcasts while you're driving and engage yourself mentally. 

Avoid distractions, and avoid wasting your energy on things that you don't have any control of - focus on what you do have control of.

  1. Focus on yourself.
  2. Set your goals, write them down, and fall asleep asking yourself what you can do to achieve them, then wake up, read them, and pursue them.

Here's to making your first million!

 

By RUDY

EXPLORE: Internet personas are really only 20% true

good news, entrepreneur tips

#WomenatWork - We spoke with @Pathbrite founder Heather Hiles. It was everything.

If you follow us on Instagram, you probably already know it's Women's History Month. In celebration, we're launching our newest series, "Women at Work."

"Women at Work" will introduce you to a carefully curated selection of working women discussing, of course, their professional lives. They'll also explore the impact these women are making - through an audacious blend of professional and personal passions - on the world around us.

First Up ... Pathbrite Founder, Heather Hiles

via leanin.org

via leanin.org

I was first "introduced" to Heather at the first Lesbians Who Tech Conference in San Francisco. We didn't actually meet. I was dizzied by a round of curious and provoking pitches from powerful women committed to diversifying tech, then sobered by Heather's discussion of her (much newer then) company, Pathbrite.

via Pathbrite

via Pathbrite

As an English Ph.D., my interest was peaked - though admittedly, more in Pathbrite than Heather. But I don't always know what's good for me.

Some two years later, watching Heather open the Capital Connections Conference in Oakland, the universe brought me to my senses.

At Capital Connections, Heather revealed that, launched in 2012, Pathbrite (the world’s first Portfolio Learning Platform) has since raised over $12,000,000, and been acquired by Cengage Learning. The company currently supports more than 500 schools, colleges, universities, and companies, and -- with Heather still serving as CEO -- "Pathbrite’s Portfolio Learning Platform is transforming learning, teaching, and assessment across the globe."

Moved by Heather's discussion of what she calls "overt inclusion" -- a commitment to not only inviting diverse representatives to the tech table, but providing them with access to equal would-be victuals when they arrive -- I decided, "We need to talk."

In my pre-call prep (Internet stalking), I was reminded that Heather is a serial entrepreneur, one who's held founding and leadership positions in multiple private and public sector organizations. For instance, she's served as Board of Directors Member of Liberty & Justice (Africa’s leading Fair Trade Certified™ apparel manufacturing company, based in Monrovia Liberia), Commissioner for the San Francisco Unified School District; Executive Director of Silicon Valley Social Venture Fund (SV2); co-founder of EARN; and CEO of SFWorks, a nonprofit that transitioned women from welfare into careers.

Heather has also previously been named as one of the Top 100 coolest people in Silicon Valley by Business Insider.

via Pathbrite

via Pathbrite

Below, you can check out some of the highlights from my chat with Heather Hiles.

On Pathbrite's ideal audience ...

Pathbrite is a modern version of the e-portfolio with the power to improve meta-cognition through learning, and mastering ... content.  [It's] helping all lifelong learners [and] built for all human beings … not just [people working] in education.

On intuition ...

[When making the decision to separate from my co-founder and transition Ripple to Pathbrite,] it was definitely a gut decision. Intuition happened earlier than action. It was like any relationship, you just know when it's time. 

...

[A lot of women believe they need a co-founder, but] trust yourself. You need one leader. You need to trust you can lead. It has never served me wrong, believing in me.

...

[You have to] get to your core. You know what you need to do. Sometimes you’re afraid of the answer, but you’re there already. Ask yourself, "What is the honest truth about the situation?"

On overt inclusion ...

It’s fulfilling. There’s not a tremendous amount of gratification in being the first of something if you can't do something meaningful with it and share that. [There's something about being there] to just share access - not pitching, just helping.

On choosing to share information and resources ...

It's about creating more opportunities for people to be in a place of growth and transformation. I'm invested in the creation of organizations, the experience of building and growing with other people. So, sharing is not a decision. It's what I have to do. It's who I am. There is a calculated decision about what and who [I give my time to] … but then it’s pure instinct.

But then, it's pure instinct. 

Interested in learning more about Heather? Check out her portfolio on Pathbrite, or follow her on Twitter.

 

by khoLi.

 

EXPLORE: I think you are a Lost Queen | Interview with founder Eboni Merriman

Meet Alexis Casson, creator of “The Peculiar Kind” 
 Khafra Co. Style Story 

 It’s been awhile since we’ve had a good  style story !  Lucky for us, we’re back with a fantastic one!   Basic bio  –> She currently lives in Brooklyn, NY, has a small Shih Tzu named Ellie Munkin Fat and can make a mean sweet potato pie. She wears many hats; Camera Operator, Editor, Photographer and she also dabbles in Graphic & Web design.   And we absolutely  love  her!   

 And not just because she let us  hang out with her for hours  while trying on vintage fur. 

 There’s really not enough that we could even say about Alexis to really let you all know just how much we love her around here.  So … we begged and pleaded and she graced us with a few answers about her style.   

   How would you describe your signature style?   “Ya’ll, I don’t have style.  My girlfriend says I dress like an asian woman. Is that PC? Probably not.  But I do have a love for big coats and jackets that drape like kimonos and I live for mandarin collars, oversized tees, boyfriend/mom jeans and flatforms (I’m short).”
        At Khafra Company, we want to dress our clients for every moment of every day - for work or play. How do you decide what you’re wearing during the week?   
“My profession actually encourages relaxed attire.”     “So I can pretty much wear what I want everyday. Usual day: docs/flatforms, vintage tee/sweatshirt and skinny rolled up jeans.”       At Khafra Company, we take style super seriously. What items in your wardrobe can you absolutely not live without? Why? What makes them so special?   “That’s hard. I’m really not attached to anything. WOW!  I know one thing that’s not fashion related that I can’t live without and recently that’s  been my leather medicine pouch and healing stones.
      If I had to pick though… I actually just splurged on two leather Jackets from Scotch & Soda and I honestly don’t know what I was wearing before I had those beauties in my life.”    What 3 things are you most looking forward to adding to your wardrobe this season?   “I’d like to add more dresses and playsuits to my wardrobe. I plan on traveling to a lot of warm places and moving to the west coast. In my mind, any place where it’s warm calls for loose-fitting, one-piece flowing things. I’m so down for living a carefree black girl experience. ”
    At Khafra Company, we think that all of our clients and customers are slightly-more-than-fierce. What does that mean to you?   “Great question. I guess it means that after all is said and done, we wear what we want. What makes us feel comfortable and confident at the same damn time. ” 

  Check out a few pieces inspired by Alexis’ style on our   Facebook page  ! 
  And don’t forget to catch up on  The Peculiar Kind !   

 And while you’re at it, make sure to get familiar with  Alexis’ body of work.  

 Want more real style from real people?
 Check out more   STYLE STORIES.

Meet Alexis Casson, creator of “The Peculiar Kind”

Khafra Co. Style Story

It’s been awhile since we’ve had a good style story! Lucky for us, we’re back with a fantastic one!

Basic bio –> She currently lives in Brooklyn, NY, has a small Shih Tzu named Ellie Munkin Fat and can make a mean sweet potato pie. She wears many hats; Camera Operator, Editor, Photographer and she also dabbles in Graphic & Web design.

And we absolutely love her! 

And not just because she let us hang out with her for hours while trying on vintage fur.

There’s really not enough that we could even say about Alexis to really let you all know just how much we love her around here. So … we begged and pleaded and she graced us with a few answers about her style.


How would you describe your signature style?

“Ya’ll, I don’t have style. My girlfriend says I dress like an asian woman. Is that PC? Probably not. But I do have a love for big coats and jackets that drape like kimonos and I live for mandarin collars, oversized tees, boyfriend/mom jeans and flatforms (I’m short).”

image

At Khafra Company, we want to dress our clients for every moment of every day - for work or play. How do you decide what you’re wearing during the week?

“My profession actually encourages relaxed attire.”

image

“So I can pretty much wear what I want everyday. Usual day: docs/flatforms, vintage tee/sweatshirt and skinny rolled up jeans.”

image

At Khafra Company, we take style super seriously. What items in your wardrobe can you absolutely not live without? Why? What makes them so special?

“That’s hard. I’m really not attached to anything. WOW! I know one thing that’s not fashion related that I can’t live without and recently that’s been my leather medicine pouch and healing stones.

image

If I had to pick though… I actually just splurged on two leather Jackets from Scotch & Soda and I honestly don’t know what I was wearing before I had those beauties in my life.” 

What 3 things are you most looking forward to adding to your wardrobe this season?

“I’d like to add more dresses and playsuits to my wardrobe. I plan on traveling to a lot of warm places and moving to the west coast. In my mind, any place where it’s warm calls for loose-fitting, one-piece flowing things. I’m so down for living a carefree black girl experience. ”

At Khafra Company, we think that all of our clients and customers are slightly-more-than-fierce. What does that mean to you?

“Great question. I guess it means that after all is said and done, we wear what we want. What makes us feel comfortable and confident at the same damn time. ”


Check out a few pieces inspired by Alexis’ style on our Facebook page!


And don’t forget to catch up on The Peculiar Kind!

And while you’re at it, make sure to get familiar with Alexis’ body of work.

Want more real style from real people?
Check out more STYLE STORIES.

We get it.  We know you wake up every day … and conquer the world.  So we’ve reposted some helpful hints on how to streamline all of that  just for you.  
  Ok maybe not, just for you … share it with someone who needs it just as bad as you do.  
  jaclynday : 
 
 Working part-time or full-time from home is a big adjustment if you’re used to working in an office full-time. When I made the transition, my biggest challenges were keeping to a schedule, staying organized and not becoming distracted by my surroundings (laundry! dishes!). (Here are  some general tips I wrote a few years ago  about working from home.) I’m constantly tempted to stay in my pajamas all day.  Leggings may not be a far cry  from pajamas, but  at least they’re not my pajamas .  
 In the past three years that I’ve worked full-time from home, I’ve discovered a few helpful tools and wanted to share: 
   A designated office space . When I first started working from home, we turned our guest room into a guest room/office, but that guest room/office is now a nursery. We struggled about the best place to move my office—we tried a corner of the living room for a while and that was great when Isobel was a newborn. Now, though, we made a spot in the corner of our bedroom for my desk, chair and a rug and while I hate staring at our bed all day (I want to get back in it, please), I do feel like I have a designated “work" spot. When I’m sitting in my chair, I feel like I’m at work. It feels different than if I was to take my laptop and sit on the couch. It doesn’t have to be a big space or a fancy space, but it does need to be  your own space .  
   A headset  . I sit on a lot of conference calls and like to use a USB headset in conjunction with my Google Voice account. A headset will usually have a clearer sound quality than using a phone on speaker.  
   Russell + Hazel Acrylic Stapler  . I originally didn’t buy a lot of standard office supplies but soon realized it was better to have them than not have them.  
   Martha Stewart Home Office Accordion File  . Once again—I didn’t expect I’d use/print a lot of paper at home, but I ended up needing several accordion files to keep it all organized.  
   Greenroom Eco Planner  . I live and die by my paper planner. I use my iPhone too, but nothing will ever truly replace a paper planner for me. When you work from home, there aren’t the typical reminders you might get an office environment (“don’t forget—meeting in 15!”), so you have to stay on top of all your shit yourself. Google Calendar is great, but I always record meetings or other items in my paper planner too. I find that the smaller the planner, the more I use it. If it’s not easily portable, I tend not to use it as religiously. That might not be true for you, but something worth mentioning! 
   Martha Stewart Home Office Trays  . I always find I have these little knick knacks floating around my desk and I don’t necessarily want to stick them in a drawer. Trays are good for keeping these organized and visible.  
   Rifle Paper Co Journal  . I keep notes two different ways: on paper and electronically (more on that later). If I’m using paper to keep notes, I prefer to use a hefty journal (in a compact size) so that I can look back and easily find notes from a call two weeks ago, for example. I date each page and write a title at the top—the name of the meeting or project. I use paper to take more general notes—ideas, who said what.  
   Hello Fax  . People still rely on faxes. I do not understand this. But inevitably someone, somewhere will need something faxed to them and that’s where Hello Fax comes in handy. Another great thing is the ability to sign and edit documents electronically. (Makes processing invoices or expense reports easy.)  
   imo app  . My office uses Gchat for internal IM and I connected my account to imo on my iPhone so I’m accessible even if I step away from my computer.  
   Pencil/pen cup  . I hate when I can’t find my good pens. I hate using bad pens. GOOD PENS STAY IN THE CUP.  
   Simplenote  . Some people swear by Evernote, but I’ve never been able to find a way to seamlessly integrate it into my workflow. Simplenote, on the other hand, is something I use all day, everyday. I use ResophNotes on my PC and Notational Velocity on my Mac and have the Simplenote app installed on my iPhone. All the notes sync across these apps and are searchable. The no-frills, minimalist appearance is really great. I use this to take the electronic notes I mentioned above. I use this for more in-depth note-taking: actual action items, to-do lists, general information I need at my finger tips to do my job effectively.  
  Google Drive . Google Drive has really transformed the way I work in the past three years and I love being able to access work documents from whatever device I’m using.  
   Rifle Paper Co. To-Do List .  Keeping a list-type notepad around is handy. I’ll often stick one in my handbag so if I am out and about and need to take notes or get a few ideas, I can jot them down quickly. Once again, I can do this in my phone too, but sometimes paper feels best. Later I’ll either transfer my paper lists to my Google Calendar, paper planner or Simplenote—whichever is most appropriate.  
  Basecamp . For more complex projects, using a collaboration tool like Basecamp can really simplify things so conference calls don’t have to happen every three days to catch people up. It’s invaluable to me as a remote employee because I can write notes, keep track of files and manage projects—and other members of the team can see these edits in real time.  
  Google Voice . I don’t have a dedicated work landline phone but instead use a Google Voice number. When it rings, it also rings my cell, our home phone and Google Voice in Gmail.  
  Dropbox . DO I NEED TO EXPLAIN WHY THIS IS ESSENTIAL? Dropbox is the sun, moon and stars. It is all-power and all-knowing.  
  Do you have any other tools (or tips) to share?

We get it.  We know you wake up every day … and conquer the world.  So we’ve reposted some helpful hints on how to streamline all of that just for you.

Ok maybe not, just for you … share it with someone who needs it just as bad as you do.

jaclynday:

Working part-time or full-time from home is a big adjustment if you’re used to working in an office full-time. When I made the transition, my biggest challenges were keeping to a schedule, staying organized and not becoming distracted by my surroundings (laundry! dishes!). (Here are some general tips I wrote a few years ago about working from home.) I’m constantly tempted to stay in my pajamas all day. Leggings may not be a far cry from pajamas, but at least they’re not my pajamas

In the past three years that I’ve worked full-time from home, I’ve discovered a few helpful tools and wanted to share:

  1. A designated office space. When I first started working from home, we turned our guest room into a guest room/office, but that guest room/office is now a nursery. We struggled about the best place to move my office—we tried a corner of the living room for a while and that was great when Isobel was a newborn. Now, though, we made a spot in the corner of our bedroom for my desk, chair and a rug and while I hate staring at our bed all day (I want to get back in it, please), I do feel like I have a designated “work" spot. When I’m sitting in my chair, I feel like I’m at work. It feels different than if I was to take my laptop and sit on the couch. It doesn’t have to be a big space or a fancy space, but it does need to be your own space
  2. A headset. I sit on a lot of conference calls and like to use a USB headset in conjunction with my Google Voice account. A headset will usually have a clearer sound quality than using a phone on speaker. 
  3. Russell + Hazel Acrylic Stapler. I originally didn’t buy a lot of standard office supplies but soon realized it was better to have them than not have them. 
  4. Martha Stewart Home Office Accordion File. Once again—I didn’t expect I’d use/print a lot of paper at home, but I ended up needing several accordion files to keep it all organized. 
  5. Greenroom Eco Planner. I live and die by my paper planner. I use my iPhone too, but nothing will ever truly replace a paper planner for me. When you work from home, there aren’t the typical reminders you might get an office environment (“don’t forget—meeting in 15!”), so you have to stay on top of all your shit yourself. Google Calendar is great, but I always record meetings or other items in my paper planner too. I find that the smaller the planner, the more I use it. If it’s not easily portable, I tend not to use it as religiously. That might not be true for you, but something worth mentioning!
  6. Martha Stewart Home Office Trays. I always find I have these little knick knacks floating around my desk and I don’t necessarily want to stick them in a drawer. Trays are good for keeping these organized and visible. 
  7. Rifle Paper Co Journal. I keep notes two different ways: on paper and electronically (more on that later). If I’m using paper to keep notes, I prefer to use a hefty journal (in a compact size) so that I can look back and easily find notes from a call two weeks ago, for example. I date each page and write a title at the top—the name of the meeting or project. I use paper to take more general notes—ideas, who said what. 
  8. Hello Fax. People still rely on faxes. I do not understand this. But inevitably someone, somewhere will need something faxed to them and that’s where Hello Fax comes in handy. Another great thing is the ability to sign and edit documents electronically. (Makes processing invoices or expense reports easy.) 
  9. imo app. My office uses Gchat for internal IM and I connected my account to imo on my iPhone so I’m accessible even if I step away from my computer. 
  10. Pencil/pen cup. I hate when I can’t find my good pens. I hate using bad pens. GOOD PENS STAY IN THE CUP. 
  11. Simplenote. Some people swear by Evernote, but I’ve never been able to find a way to seamlessly integrate it into my workflow. Simplenote, on the other hand, is something I use all day, everyday. I use ResophNotes on my PC and Notational Velocity on my Mac and have the Simplenote app installed on my iPhone. All the notes sync across these apps and are searchable. The no-frills, minimalist appearance is really great. I use this to take the electronic notes I mentioned above. I use this for more in-depth note-taking: actual action items, to-do lists, general information I need at my finger tips to do my job effectively. 
  12. Google Drive. Google Drive has really transformed the way I work in the past three years and I love being able to access work documents from whatever device I’m using. 
  13. Rifle Paper Co. To-Do ListKeeping a list-type notepad around is handy. I’ll often stick one in my handbag so if I am out and about and need to take notes or get a few ideas, I can jot them down quickly. Once again, I can do this in my phone too, but sometimes paper feels best. Later I’ll either transfer my paper lists to my Google Calendar, paper planner or Simplenote—whichever is most appropriate. 
  14. Basecamp. For more complex projects, using a collaboration tool like Basecamp can really simplify things so conference calls don’t have to happen every three days to catch people up. It’s invaluable to me as a remote employee because I can write notes, keep track of files and manage projects—and other members of the team can see these edits in real time. 
  15. Google Voice. I don’t have a dedicated work landline phone but instead use a Google Voice number. When it rings, it also rings my cell, our home phone and Google Voice in Gmail. 
  16. Dropbox. DO I NEED TO EXPLAIN WHY THIS IS ESSENTIAL? Dropbox is the sun, moon and stars. It is all-power and all-knowing. 

Do you have any other tools (or tips) to share?

It’s a stressful job that can create emotional turbulence. For starters, there’s the high risk of failure. Three out of four venture-backed start-ups fail, according to research by Shikhar Ghosh, a Harvard Business School lecturer. Ghosh also found that more than 95 percent of start-ups fall short of their initial projections. Entrepreneurs often juggle many roles and face countless setbacks—lost customers, disputes with partners, increased competition, staffing problems—all while struggling to make payroll. “There are traumatic events all the way along the line,” says psychiatrist and former entrepreneur Michael A. Freeman, who is researching mental health and entrepreneurship. Complicating matters, new entrepreneurs often make themselves less resilient by neglecting their health. They eat too much or too little. They don’t get enough sleep. They fail to exercise. “You can get into a start-up mode, where you push yourself and abuse your body,” Freeman says. “That can trigger mood vulnerability.”
The Psychological Price of Entrepreneurship | Inc. 5000 (via mickeymichaelmiguel)

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Khafra Company Presents: In the Mix - A Business Warming

We recently had our business warming in downtown Oakland, CA.

You know … like a house warming but instead of friends and families bringing you gift cards and and useless items to fill our house, we invited business owners (some friends, some soon to be friends) to get together and celebrate the beginning of Khafra Company with us!  

They didn’t bring us presents.  But, they did bring us the best thing business owners can ask for: good community and great ideas.

PLUS: More than a few of these entrepreneurs left with new connections to enhance their own brands.  And we could all use a network that … well … works.

Entrepreneurs and Friends Gathered to Support Khafra Company

Oh ya … We also threw in some amazing food and desserts from Kainbigan and LulaMae Bakes!

Want to join in the celebration?! We want to know what items you love the most so that we can stock up for our official online boutique launch in the fall.

How can you help?! We’re releasing a small batch of summer accessory samples next week. Sign-up today for first dibs.

It’s that simple.